About your Search

20130422
20130422
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5
. now i'll ask about the faa furloughs, which started yesterday. a group of almost the entire airline industry, including air traffic controller unions, flight attendants, pilot unions, and the industry itself, have written denis mcdonough and the white house a letter saying that the faa should be granted flexibility so they don't have to furlough the air traffic controllers. what do you say to this broad coalition? they say that other agencies have been given such flexibility and they believe the faa should have the same flexibility. >> let me give you some facts. the department of transportation is required by law to cut about $1 billion between now and the end of september; $637 million of that comes from the faa. the faa has initiated a series of cost-saving measures for personnel and non-personnel related, including a hiring freeze, restrictions on travel, termination of certain temporary employees, and reductions to contracts, among other savings. but furloughs cannot be avoided. seventy percent of the faa's operations budget is personnel. the faa must furlough 47,000 employees
air traffic controllers must take one day off a week. the faa said planes will have to take off and land more frequently. that would translate to potential longer lines at the airport. joining me is the spokesperson for sfo. can you give me an idea of how many travelers will be out on every given day or? >> what i can tell you, it's about a 10% of reduction. if i'm an air traffic controller, one of my days out of ten is reduced as the furlough. >> reporter: do you have any idea if this will impact the lines? >> i think where we might see some effect is more from the faa perspective. i don't know if it will affect the lines at the airport. but in terms of flight delays, if there's another airport that has congestion issues or staffing issues, even if we're fined locally, we may experience delays to and from the location. it's very much a nationwide issue. >> reporter: it's a juggling act for you. i think one of the things we can expect, there is a procedure we use and that requires an extra controller. not an issue today but if we have bad weather conditions, we might not be able
and pilot organizations are trying to stop the furloughs from happening by suing the faa but they are here and commercial flights really move flatly throughout the united states yesterday. but the real test will come together. that is because air traffic -- because of budget cuts all air traffic controllers must take one day off every two weeks. that means they will lose one traffic controller every day. santa rosa airport they were down at least one controller yesterday. folks there said they were concerned about safety and felt the government could have made cuts elsewhere. >> we are looking at a tiny percentage that needs if be reduced. it's ridiculous they can't do that. you and i can certainly if we want to take $5 off of our spending for lunch over a month, it's easy for us to do. >> reporter: yesterday sfo and ma theta san jose reported no problems. sources inside the air traffic control tower here said four workers were furloughed yesterday. we still have to find out how many are furloughed today. meanwhile 100 contract towers in small airports across the country are scheduled to s
. soon they'll be facing long waits at the terminal as well. last week the f.a.a. -- that the federal aviation administration -- announced it's starting this week thousands of flights every day that will be delayed for up to three hours because of the devastating, ash administer cuts of -- ash terror cuts of sequester strags, the f.a.a. is forced to furlough thousands of workers. this could lead to 6,700 flight delays eay this summer. i repeat, every day 6,700 delayed flights. by comparison, the worst travel day of last year 2012 was about 3,000 flights being delayed. this was after severe thunderstorms accompanied by two-inch hailstorms, and a 90-mile-an-hour wind that wiped across the northeast and a tornado touched down in new york. that, mr. president, caused 3,000 flight delays. on any day if this sequester strags kicks in, it will double that. travelers were stranded at airports across the country during that real bad day we had last week. some were stranded for days. mr. president, it's going to be worse than that. as i said, this summer more than twice that number of flights w
, and what we think is the right solution is the faa, the government agency, they need to learn with those bodies. they need to learn to understand exactly what's being done in the different industries to deal with different threats. and that's how we're going to develop our own best practice. >> host: gautham nagesh. >> greg, you mentioned that thebacking industry is largely ahead of the curve when it comes to these sorts of things, likely due to the nature of the business itself, and like you said, the criminals are often looking for money. how would you say the broader employees of your industry, how successful would your education efforts be, would you say, and have there been any keys that could be applied to other critical infrastructure sectors? >> guest: i think the, you know, by and large, employees within the financial institutions, um, are fairly well aware of what's going on, and, you know, given over the last year increasing news about attacks on the financial system, the awareness has only grown. as part of every bank's standard procedures, employees are tested. they're train
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)